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The Izala Movement in Nigeria

dc.contributor.authorBen Amara, Ramzi
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T12:02:56Z
dc.date.available2020-09-22T12:02:56Z
dc.date.issued2020de
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.17875/gup2020-1329
dc.format.extent221de
dc.format.mediumPrintde
dc.language.isoengde
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGöttinger Reihe zur Ethnologie - Göttingen Series in Social and Cultural Anthropologyde
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.de
dc.subject.ddc300
dc.subject.otherOAPENde
dc.titleThe Izala Movement in Nigeriade
dc.title.alternativeGenesis, Fragmentation and Revivalde
dc.typemonographde
dc.price.print30,00
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:7-isbn-978-3-86395-460-4-3
dc.description.printSoftcover, 17x24de
dc.subject.divisionpeerReviewedde
dc.relation.isbn-13978-3-86395-460-4
dc.identifier.articlenumber8102079de
dc.identifier.internisbn-978-3-86395-460-4de
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume018de
dc.subject.bisacSOC002010
dc.subject.vlb750
dc.subject.bicJ
dc.description.abstractengOn the basis on solid fieldwork in northern Nigeria including participant observation, interviews with Izala, Sufis, and religion experts, and collection of unpublished material related to Izala, three aspects of the development of Izala past and present are analysed: its split, its relationship to Sufis, and its perception of sharīʿa re-implementation. “Field Theory” of Pierre Bourdieu, “Religious Market Theory” of Rodney Start, and “Modes of Religiosity Theory” of Harvey Whitehouse are theoretical tools of understanding the religious landscape of northern Nigeria and the dynamics of Islamic movements and groups.de
dc.subject.engNigeriade
dc.subject.engIzalade
dc.subject.engrevivalde
dc.notes.vlb-printlieferbar
dc.intern.doi10.17875/gup2020-1329de
dc.identifier.purlhttp://resolver.sub.uni-goettingen.de/purl?univerlag-isbn-978-3-86395-460-4
dc.format.chapters-de


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