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Ancient Texts and Languages of Ethnic Groups along the Silk Road

dc.contributor.editorReckel, Johannes
dc.contributor.editorSchatz, Merle
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-03T11:24:58Z
dc.date.available2021-03-03T11:24:58Z
dc.date.issued2021de
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.17875/gup2021-1589
dc.format.extent227de
dc.format.mediumPrintde
dc.language.isoengde
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.de
dc.subject.ddc300
dc.titleAncient Texts and Languages of Ethnic Groups along the Silk Roadde
dc.typeconferencede
dc.price.print38,00
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:7-isbn-978-3-86395-489-5-5
dc.description.printSoftcover, 17x24de
dc.subject.divisionsurveyedde
dc.relation.isbn-13978-3-86395-489-5
dc.identifier.articlenumber8102140de
dc.identifier.internisbn-978-3-86395-489-5de
dc.relation.eventInternational Colloquia on Ancient Manuscripts and Literatures of the Minorities in China ; 8 (Göttingen) : 2018.11
dc.subject.bisacSOC000000
dc.subject.vlb510
dc.subject.bicJ
dc.description.abstractengCentral Asia has been dominated by Mongolian and Turkic speaking nations for the past 1300 years. Uyghurs and Uzbeks were the most important traders on the Central Asian Silk Roads. Earlier Sogdians and Tokharians and other ethnic groups speaking Indo-Germanic (Indo-Iranian) languages were active on these ancient trade routes. In the 18th and 19th century a Tungus language, Manchu, became important for Sinkiang, Mongolia and the whole of China. Expansion policy of different realms, comprehensive commercial activities and the spread of religious ideas facilitated the exchange of (cultural) knowledge along the Silk Road. Texts and scripts tell us not only about the different groups that were in contact, but also reflect details of diplomatic, religious, and economic ambitions and the languages that were used for these different forms of communication. Several examples of contact induced language change or specific linguistic influence as a result of contacts along the Silk Road invite us to understand more about the frequency, intensity and intention of contacts that took place in very different regions connected by the Silk Road.de
dc.notes.vlb-printlieferbar
dc.intern.doi10.17875/gup2021-1589de
dc.identifier.purlhttp://resolver.sub.uni-goettingen.de/purl?univerlag-isbn-978-3-86395-489-5
dc.format.chapters-de
dc.identifier.asin3863954890


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